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Label Focus: Toy Tonics

Don’t let the name fool you, this lot are not playing around… 

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Label Focus – Under My Feet.

Meet the London post-punk crew who combine DJ, live performances and art exhibitions

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Label Focus – On the Corner

Pete Buckenham talks us through what makes his On the Corner label tick

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Label Focus – KOMPAKT

The rich musical heritage of Cologne has brought us everything from Can to Air Liquide but arguably its current premier standard bearers are the KOMPAKT label. They’ve clocked up more than 600 releases by everyone from Sasha and Gus Gus to John Tejada and The Orb. and have just released the 21st of their annual Total compilation series.

Michael Mayer, who not only plays a big part in running the label but often contributes his own distinctively atmospheric productions to the catalogue. took a few moments out of his busy schedule to tell us more.

Michael Mayer

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?
KOMPAKT is owned by Jurgen Paape, Wolfgang Voigt and myself, Michael Mayer, and run by the latter and Jon Berry.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?
KOMPAKT was forged in 1998 as a conclusion of numerous other labels and activities the same group of people was doing since 1993. 

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….
We’ve released more than 600 releases on KOMPAKT and its offshoots KOMPAKT EXTRA, KOMPAKT POP, and K2. We’ve been working with artists like The Orb, DJ Koze, Gui Boratto, The Field, GAS, Weval, ANNA, Sascha Funke, Thomas Fehlmann, Marc Romboy, Kölsch to name a few.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?
We call it the KOMPAKT gen. 

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC) ?
It’s all about the dots and eagles.

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE?  TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.
Oxia’s ‘Domino’ is still holding the pole position. Fun fact: It’s one of the very few records in our catalogue that my partner Wolfgang and I argued about. I thought ‘Domino’ sounded too generic and voted against its release. Luckily, Wolfgang had his way. 

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID            
Fahrland – Night Versions.

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?
Richard H Kirk... his influence on modern pop and dance music is still scandalously underrated. May he rest in peace.

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?
I was an avid Nu Groove collector, my buy on sight label in the early 90s. They had a new release almost every week and you never knew what kind of music you’d get… Joey Beltram techno, Bobby Konders dancehall or jazzy deep house from the Burrell brothers. One could see Nu Groove as a blueprint for what KOMPAKT has become: a home for all kinds of electronic music.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?
We’ve got some exciting new signings ready: Berlin’s Kollmorgen does hauntingly beautiful electronic pop, Archil & Leon from Paris create funky sounds with their self made instruments and Ramses from Amsterdam are carving their own niche in indie dance. As tradition demands, we’ll end 2021 with the 21st edition of our Pop Ambient compilation

Label Focus – Just Jack

The label’s co-owner Dan Wild tells all

We shine a light on one of the new skool of fast rising Bristol labels, the one and only Just Jack

They’re known for their many nights championing house legends perhaps not so familiar with the city of Bristol – including US powerhouses Sonja Moonear and Theo Parrish. But besides from all this stellar in the events sector, Just Jack have confidently built up a solid roster of artists for their label over the last seven years, with highlight releases by Beesemunt Soundsystem, Mr G, Simoncino, and even the great Larry Heard – who, as we’ve heard through the grapevine, has stopped by for remix duties of the latter’s most recent EP. We spoke with Just Jack label co-owner Dan Wild for a chat over authenticity, the art of curveball-throwing, and the joys of loudly coloured vinyl.

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

Just Jack. Now run by myself (Dan Wild) and Ryan Harris, but many other people have contributed and worked on the project over the years.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

The label started in 2014. We’ve taken little breaks here and there and the output has been far from regular, but we have some great stuff going to press at the moment, so watch out… we’re coming for your ears!

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….

Our first release was an out and out banger from Beesmunt Soundsystem… big piano hook, vocal and killer B-side with a remix from Amir Alexander (an artist we have worked with consistently over the years). 

We were lucky enough to sign an EP from Mr G, as well as recent EPs from Detroit legend Gari Romalis and Italy’s Hotmix record boss Simoncino (look out for a remix EP of this from Larry Heard, under his Gherkin Jerks alias, along with Chez Damier

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg; go get your earholes round our back catalogue there are some beauties that’ll get your feet tapping and your jaw swinging.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

We always like to keep one eye on the dancefloor, but apart from that it can sit anywhere in the realms of house and techno. Sometimes we throw a curveball, but most of the tracks are straight up dancefloor tackle!

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC) ?

Wow, this has changed over the years. We’re currently loving minimal plastic see-through sleeves and coloured vinyl, but the cost of raw materials, pressing times and just curiosity to follow different directions could see this change in the future. Our next two records are pressed, or have gone to press, and they are bright yellow and silver, so for at least then, coloured vinyl is still the name of the game.

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE? TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR

I think it was our first release from Beesmunt Soundsystem, go check it out and you’ll understand why. It had huge crossover appeal!

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID

My debut EP.  Only joking – LOL!  I think perhaps our last release from Simoncino, it was a bit experimental in parts for some people, whereas other people loved it.

He has such an amazing output, and I’m still trying to convince him to tell me how he gets his kick drums sounding so amazing.

To be honest I think being a very dancefloor-focused label has meant tough times through lockdown. As an avid collector myself I suddenly realised how little I had my mind on buying that type of music until my first post lockdown gig a couple of weeks ago. That has changed now and I feel like I’m playing catch up, but with the re-opening of clubs and festivals this summer. I hope I’m not the only one, as I definitely know I overlooked some gems in lockdown!

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

Wow, I mean, I nearly shat my pants getting Larry Heard on remix duties. You don’t get much better than that! He is a complete and utter legend of the highest order. Props to Simoncino for bringing it to the table!

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

Any label that sticks to its guns, has a sound or feeling and although the music may be different it fits with their ethos.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

We’ve just released an EP from mul.apin… an amazing new artist! This one is certainly one for the sweaty late night dancefloors.

Youandewan has turned in a stripped back, jacking remix of that which should turn some heads.

After that We have an EP from a good friend of mine Iain Blevins with Secret Sundaze smashing their first remix out of the park. This one bangs hard!

Then we have a remix EP of Simoncino with Larry Heard under his Gherkin Jerks alias and Chi-town house don Chez Damier, before we do our first ever V/A which will have some great names on it. But I cant say much for now!

Unfortunately anyone in the vinyl business knows pressing times have been massively affected recently so some of this might not be seeing the light of day as soon as we’d like.

Label Focus – Aaja Music

We meet the South London crew Aaja Music

Despite being based in London for a number of years now, Aaja are only just getting started. Headquartered in the Deptford Arches underneath the railway station – sandwiched between the world-famous Deptford Market, and jazz cornerstone venue Buster Mantis – they’ve been going strong as an independent radio station and low-key venue since their start, championing club and electronic music sourced from friends and local legends. 

Now, they’ve started their very own label, cementing themselves further as a force to be reckoned with. Intrigued by the fact that they’ve kicked off this new venture with an EP from US titan Controlled Weirdness, we gave them the once-over. Read on!

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

The record label is called Aaja and is run by electronic music lifers Everson (@e_v_e_r_s_o_n)  & Patch the Whale (@patchthewhale)

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

We came up with the idea of Aaja (@aajamusic) after a long journey driving an old silver transit from London to Berlin, then Berlin to Manchester. Myself and Patch listened to hours and hours of music. Either written by ourselves, our friends or established artists. We found ourselves as we always do, passionately talking about music and our love for raving. 

Amongst the late night neon nights and Mexicana blurs in Berlin we discussed further our idea for the label. We wanted the label to support our network of friends, ourselves, along with opening a gateway to some unsung heroes of ours. Not following too many fads or trends. It’s an audible quest for deep, raw club rollers. 

By the time we arrived in Manchester we had already hatched the plan to launch a label. 

The label was originally started in January 2018, with our first release going out in March 2018.

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN

Our first release came in the form of a collaborative EP. Featuring Ady Toledano, Everson, In:State & Guili and Alex Rrichards on a run of 12”. The tracks were a mix of deep, ceremonial journies best suited for those late nights and early mornings, along with deep in the rave moments, UK influenced percussion and sledging techno.

The label was put on ice in September 2019, while we were obsessed about opening Aaja as a physical space, encompassing a radio station, bar and event space. This later led to a run of warehouse parties at Venue MOT and The Cause. With guests including Asquith, Frazer Ray, Finn, DJ October, Enchanted Rhythms and Amy Alford. 

Next up is Sounds From A Disappearing City by Controlled Weirdness.

We have known Neil for a considerable amount of time and followed him as an artist for even longer. He’s also a regular down at Aaja, and we’ve often ended up on the same dancefloor. 

He’s written some wicked electro breaksy slammers for this record, but has an impressive back catalogue going back to the 90’s of productions that still sound fresh to this day. He also runs a regular South East London electro night called Electric Sweat, dedicated to our late friend, Nacho.

If you have time, give him a follow online and get along to one of his gigs or cop one of his records. You wont regret it.

Controlled Weirdness

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

With our main Aaja imprint we tend to look for originality, quality, experience and well rounded late night rollers. With our sub label Sidewinders we look for a diverse, bouncy, UK-influenced, cheeky tones that can slam a dancefloor. 

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC)?

Our label has always been focused around the snake. The Aaja logo is a nod to the rich UK dance history, the Aaja logo is inspired by the fabled label Moving Shadow. We also loved the idea of the snake spinning around a 12”.

The snake itself was on the floor of a zoo out in Australia which Everson snapped while out there. The name Aaja was devised by Patch, Aaja meaning come together or right now in Hindi. We see the snake being able to move in many ways, along with being able to shed its skin, refresh and adapt. Exactly how we see our label, station and event series.

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE?  TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.

Our label was put on hold while we established the station. However Aaja 001 sold out worldwide. We’re actually soon to run a digital re-release of this first EP.  

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

Ratface – a burgeoning, underground SE London label. Catering for broken beats and UK garage. We love this label, they actively seek out unsigned artists on SC, sign them up and release the music independently on Bandcamp. Always directly supporting the artists they work with. Guaranteed to hear some cheeky numbers, along with often being introduced to some really original music. 

Other than that – Local Action, Discworld, Sneaker Social Club, Enchanted Rhythms.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK FORWARD TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

We have big plans for AAJA 004, aligning with someone we’re unable to mention at this stage. But keep locked…

This year we also introduce ‘Sidewinders’ our sister label, with digital and vinyl releases coming from Ekula, Everson and some of the immediate Aaja family. Ekula is the first bass riddled release. So we’re pretty hyped about that. 


Label Focus – Where To Now?

Brighton label comes under the Label Focus spotlight

This one is special. Despite their scarce public correspondence, we’ve somehow blagged a meeting with Where To Now? for their first ever interview. 

WTN are responsible for a slew of formerly-tape, now-vinyl releases. U, Beatrice Dillon, Space Afrika, KETEV, December, Ondness, H.Takahashi, Machine Woman and Bergsonist are regular contributors to this ever-growing behemoth of gritty electronics, forged in the coastal mists of Brighton and stained by the gunk of punk.

A good few months after sending our stock questions to their email – resigned to the possibility that they may never reply – these responses, from CEOs James and Matt, hit our inbox yesterday. We jumped at the chance to publish them. Get ready for a sneak peek at their no-wavey and Merzy influences, Brighton origins, and even some indications at what they’re looking for in their new signings… 

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

Where To Now?, and it’s run by us, James & Matt.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

Around 2008. We had been running a small post-punk / no wave / electronics night and a radio show in Brighton, distributing some homemade CD comps. Brighton was a bit of a hive of activity around that time and as people around us in bands started experimenting with other projects and possibilities. We decided to stick out a few tapes by friends, and momentum quickly grew from there.

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….

We’ve done something like 90+ releases if you include a handful of digital-only bits too. In the early days of the label we had a thing going with the cassette bundles coming thick and fast. There was just too much good stuff on our radar that needed to be heard – it’s humbling and amazing to see some of those artists we worked with back then going on to do bigger things – Beatrice Dillon, Space Afrika, KETEV, December, Ondness, H.Takahashi, Machine Woman, Bergsonist (I could go on)… 

We truly treasure those early bits. First record we put out into the world was from WANDA GROUP and I dunno, we just rolled from there really being guided by works we believed in. A lot of what we were doing was leaning towards the weirder side of the dancefloor and for a bit we experimented with a club-focused imprint (WHEREIIDANCE), as well as a strictly ambient offshoot (Where To Be?). But it quickly became apparent that with just the two of us we needed some kind of focus to steer the label – it’s all very well being into loads of different stuff, but to think you can ‘do it all’ and maintain an identity and momentum was a bit naive in hindsight – it just felt like a lot. 

Since we moved away from tapes to vinyl, we’ve tried to keep our output varied but also to maintain a Where To Now? sound and aesthetic, which we’re aware sounds proper wanky but it’s hard to explain. We know when something’s a fit for the label, and we think/hope our audience gets it too.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

The whole project is really a reflection of our shifting interests, tastes and concerns. Frankly this is still a part-time hobby project so it just ebbs and flows with our constantly moving focus, not just with what we want to hear, but also within our personal and professional lives. I don’t think either of us are out here looking for particular things, but as I said we do know a WTN? release when we hear it. And again that ‘shit, more people need to hear this’ feeling guides most of our decision making.

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC)?

Our visual identity has always been an integral part of the label. Record cover design is an obsession, from naive 60’s psyche cover art, through the 70’s New York punk and no wave primitivism, and the seemingly endless supply of post-punk DIY 7″s and their anything goes DADA/Merz approach to design. It all goes into the mix and gets distilled and put through the WTN? design process. We tend to get quite involved because we’ve both been staring at album cover art for 25 years and we have a fairly clear idea about what we want from a WTN? cover. I love labels that have a continuous line of enquiry when it comes to their design output, so that is something we’re trying to emulate. 

Light and clean is what we’re usually going for whether done in-house or commissioned. I’m not too into the use of superfluous designer-y flairs, and always want to steer clear of design trends. We also do things to a tight budget as we’re entirely self-funded, so simplicity is key. We still try to be bold though. We’ve had a few direction changes over the years, and most recently we’ve fully embraced our DIY status by moving back to a more handmade process which has brought back much more fun to the whole cycle.

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE? TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.

We only press in small numbers so we’re never really going to have a ‘big’ selling release but yes, for sure, we’ve had the good fortune of having a good number of very well-received releases that have in turn created a focus to our wider catalogue. But it always still comes as a surprise when a release really does take off… 

And then others definitely don’t, and that’s absolutely fine. We’re aware that a lot of our output doesn’t have a commercial appeal, and often we’ll go in knowing that a record is going to make a loss when the time is right, but again it comes back to that belief that something deserves a light shone onto it. To be honest, after all of these releases we’re still in a position that one record pays for the next, and again, that’s fine.

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID

Definitely a few records that we felt went under the radar a bit.. The Manta LP, the Assel and CVN 12″s in particular. 

In the early days we produced tapes in small quantities in rapid succession, so I do wonder if a lot of those releases have actually gone unheard by a lot of people, which would be a shame. They’re all mostly still available digitally though, so I would recommend digging through the earlier catalog – Nadia Khan, Tom James Scott, Moon Wheel, FDG, Eugene Ward… this interview is sending me down a nice little WTN? rabbit hole to be honest. Dekalb Works’ LP, which came out at the start of this year, is also 100% worth your time.

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

We get to put out records by U, so I think we’re good. Although there’s probably lots of old UK DIY, or minimal wave artists that we both would’ve loved to have on the label.

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

Fast Product played a big part in kicking the whole thing off, not to mention it’s where we got the name from. Really there’s too many to mention for a couple of people who are really into a lot of different music. Xpressway, Siltbreeze, Sublime Frequencies, RVNG, Freedom To Spend, Firecracker, Blackest Ever Black, UR, Stones Throw, Cherry Red, 12th Isle, Load, Recital, Room 40, Numero – instances of identity, care and curation combined with palpable respect for the work and the creator basically.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

It’s slower days at the moment thanks to life… Recently working with Machinefabriek was a trip, to put out what in his own words is “my favorite album in my discography”. It’s been great to work with Nicola Ratti again, in his foray into submerged trip-hop with Japanese MC MA, and the debut LP from young prodigy Max Winter just dropped…. there’s more exciting bits ahead.

Promise, we will try and get as many U records into the world as we can. Some of the bits that are sat on need to be heard to be believed. We’re also very excited about doing our first double LP this year.

Label Focus – The Disco Express

We meet the East Londoners who turned loft parties into a leading disco label

Some labels are churner-outers, and The Disco Express are as good an example as any. The East London outfit has been going strong since September of last year, releasing a plethora of V/A and solo EPs by their in-orbit contemporaries, including Soundsmith, Pete Maxey and 1-800 Disco. 

Beginning as a loft party, we can only speculate that TDE’s stress tolerance must have been stretched to ultra-elastic proportions, weatherbeaten by the glut of experience they’ve accrued. It might be why they’re able to handle such a machine-like new music output; – they’re scheduled to push three new vinyl EPs in this yearly quarter alone. 

We caught up with label boss Bustin’ Loose (pictured above) for our bi-monthly Label Focus chat, welcoming them to the fold in a discussion of the upcoming trio of releases: ‘The Iridescence’, ‘Globally Sourced’ and ‘Best Of 2021’…

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

The Disco Express, is run in London by myself Tom Lilly (Bustin’ Loose) alongside Pete Maxey and our Berlin cohorts Craig White (1-800-Disco) and Hedley Smith (Soundsmith).

Pete Maxey

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

The label officially begun in September 2020. Having thrown a sequence of monthly loft parties from March 2017 (with Dave Lee ZR, Crazy P, Eli Escobar, Tiger & Woods, Kon – too many to name), the pandemic was the catalyst to start the label. Venues closed, we dived head first into music production and haven’t looked back since.

@gavinmillsphotography

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….

One year in, we’re now up to fifteen releases on the label. We’re fanatics of nu-disco, disco, house,  funk ‘n’ soul and electronic music. Alongside our resident DJs and artists we’ve released original music from the likes of Monsieur Van Pratt, C.Da Afro, Venessa Jackson, Tuesday Brunch, Donny Rotten and Tigerbalm.

We also have a super successful XPRESS Edits series featuring reworks by Parisian Soul, Javi Frias, Hector Zeroni, Davide Del Vecchio, Boogietraxx and Joshua Mooney.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

It has to hit me instinctively as something I must play in a club or to an audience. Music with soul and feeling; sounds that resonate with you and urge you to dance.

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC) ?

The Disco Express is a fusion of NYC 70’s club culture and nu era disco in London. Our event posters reflected that throwback and over time they evolved into far slicker designs featuring a newer neon logo and our signature train mascot. For each original release we keep the same composition and tune the colour scheme to the music.

With our videos, we like to keep it simple. Album art with animated graphics, subtle glitches and popping smoke from the train. The XPRESS Edits series artwork is a homage of white labels.

1-800 Disco

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE?  TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.

Our first vinyl Bustin’ Loose – Disco Connection racked up 300+ sales which isn’t too bad for our very first run – especially in the midst of a pandemic.

It features two super rare afro disco reworks and two Philly disco edits on the flip. It’s full of energy and big room disco flavours.

With regards to digital releases Funk Force EP by Monsieur Van Pratt and C.Da Afro absolutely nailed it. A proper disco-funk bomb.

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID               

Tuesday Brunch + Donny Rotten’s London To Sydney EP is a killer showcase in sample house. Four absolute heaters consisting of soulful grooves, weighty beats and intricate production

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

Isaac Hayes is a huge inspiration for me. A genius conductor, composer, singer and influential force of nature.

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

Toy Tonics, Athens Of The North, Razor-N-Tape and Whiskey Disco. I love all of these labels and have had the pleasure in releasing my own music on two of them. What they’ve done from humble beginnings is nothing short of incredible. They all boast a signature sound and are established names in the underground house, disco and electronic scene. Years of consistency and hard work, churning out heaters. These are the type of labels defining the nu-disco sound at the moment and certainly a group I’d want to have The Disco Express up there with one day.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

Three stellar new Summer vinyl: Bustin’ Loose – Iridescence, Soundsmith – Globally Sourced and our much anticipated Best of 2021 compilation. I’m very proud to be working with some great people on these. Our goal is to champion the nu-disco sound in London; being the platform for talented newcomers and up-and-coming artists. Less than a year in, there’s still plenty to do, but we’re well and truly on our way!

Label Focus – 20/20 Vision

We chat to 20/20 founder Ralph Lawson

Leeds-based stalwarts of the scene 20/20 Vision need no introduction, with something over 400 releases to their name and a roster that reads like a who’s who of house and techno. Founder and figurehead of the stable Ralph Lawson takes us through the details….

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

20/20 Vision. We’re based in Leeds in the UK. It was founded in 1995 by me, Ralph Lawson, and the label manager is Ben Thompson.

WHY DID THE LABEL START?

The label started to release music coming out of a studio with Carl Finlow behind the mixing desk in the spirit of Acid House DIY.  It was situated in a farmhouse inside The Rhubarb Triangle – strange but true.

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….

Wow, where to start?  By the end of the year the label will be on our 330th EP release, not including albums and sub labels, so that must be over 400 in total.  We have consistently sought to develop and nurture new talent over the years as it’s a real buzz to be there from the beginning of an artist’s journey.

A brief selection of artists includes; Crazy P, Paul Woolford, Stacey Pullen, Maya Jane Coles, Greg Wilson, Keith Tucker, Carl Finlow, The Hacker, Christian Loffler, Motor City Drum Ensemble, Versalife, Subb-an, Huxley, Joyce Muniz, Audiojack, Annie Hall, Kosh, James Shinra but there’s so many more…

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

In general we love music that stands out from the crowd as a bit different. We try not to get genre focused and always enjoy fresh perspectives and artistic states of mind.

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC)?

The label was originally done with DIY design ethics with very basic labels before The Designers Republic took over the label visual identity for many years, as did We Are Vapour based in Leeds. We have since moved to an artist led approach to design where we work closely with the artist on their creative vision for the visual identity. This has led to using a few different designers and choosing which suits on a project-by-project basis.

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID

Debukas is an artist from Scotland who made a fantastic album on the label called ‘I am Machinery’ back in 2013.

It still sounds great but it’s all about being in the right place at the right time. Definitely recommend discovering it still if you missed it the first time…

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

Aphex Twin, Richard D. James needs no introduction or explanation…

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

Warp Records 

Central Processing Unit from Sheffield for their incredibly consistent output, design and integrity.  

Electro Records from Madrid for the unbelievable handcrafted work they put into every single aspect of making a record. 

Furthur Electronix also have superb taste in design and music.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

20/20 Vision has been really productive in lockdown: We’re been working on a series called Exit Planet Earth focusing on electro, breaks and space funk which has been flying out of Juno on vinyl. The latest edition (EPE05) featuring; Carl Finlow, Plant43, Mr.Ho & Xiaolin and Alfred is out now with EPE06/07 available to pre-order on Juno.

Of course we’re also well known for house & techno as well and as clubs return we’ll have some killer tracks for DJs boxes coming on a new label curated by Luther Vine (Phonica) called Fragments of Reality so watch out for those…

Label Focus – Opilec Music

We meet I-Robots AKA DJ/producer and founder of Opilec Music, Gianlucca Pandullo…

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

Opilec Music. ‘Opilec’ is a story by Josef Čapek, a writer and cubist painter, and the brother of Karel Čapek. He’s credited as the man who invented the term “robot”, which originally meant “servant”. From this etymology, which truly inspired all of Isaac Asimov’s literature, comes Opilec Music.

I built the label around Asimov’s thoughts on technology; how it is not humanity’s enemy, but a friendly real and useful extension of our mind. I believe robots are our friends in music too.

We mainly do old-school disco, Chicago house & Detroit techno, as well as early 80’s italo, synth, electro and cosmic disco. We also love krautrock and any other electronic genre with its own influence on the history of dance music.

Our sublabel, Turin Dancefloor Express, was build to reflect my own experiences as a DJ and collector and from time spent digging in archives, old collections and anywhere else I could. The aim is to put out music that outlines how important Turin and the Piedmont area was to the development of electronic and dance music in the 70s and 80s. Its logo artwork draws on the logo that the monorail company Alweg used from Turin’s historical photo archives, and since FIAT is based in Turin, it’s become known as Italy’s Motor City, which adds another nice layer of circularity.

Interestingly, many of the tunes from this period were made by live bands until DJs and producers took over. This rubbed off onto the dance music that emerged later; we’ve had some seminal names join for releases on the label, with earlier influences ranging from psychedelic funk, to neo-R&B, to soul, disco, afrobeat, rock and pop and so much more. The tunes are all uptempo, with classic synth sounds and weird vocals, rare grooves and cosmic oddities all hoping to colour the trip.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

I started Opilec around 2008 after formerly working with Irma Records, Irma Elettrica, Relish Records and Lucy Lee Quality Recordings. I thought it was high time to start my own label after becoming tired of waiting for responses from others, who weren’t really on the same artistic page as myself, and had very different musical backgrounds. Turin Dancefloor Express started in 2016 with its first CD compilation, and later became a full-blown sub-imprint..

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN…

We’ve been trying to keep it eclectic on Opilec, putting out mainly nu-disco, indie dance, deep house, mash-ups, and re-edits. The sublabel, on the other hand, has been putting out retro disco influenced solely by 70’s/80’s Piedmont and Turin. 

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

I personally select the artists and their music. I usually get involved, helping them finalise their tracks to guarantee a solid sound and result. I know what I like, so every release comes out with a view to complementing what I would play in my sets. I always try to prioritise friendships and collaborations with VIP artists, but will also always give new artists the chance they deserve.

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC)?

Art and music go hand in hand, which is why each release always comes with artwork signed by an international artist, painter, or designer. Over the years I’ve worked with LittleYorke, Kae Seak, Artefract, and Tomozo. We generally go for abstract and cosmic art, but also hi-tech and retrofuturistic vintage styles. 

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE? TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.

The Units’ ‘Connections’ EP, taken from the main ‘Connections’ 3xCD release. It has two I-Robots reconstructions and a Todd Terje remix. 

Another one that did very well was the Giorgio Moroder vs. I-Robots release, ‘Utopia’. It was officially approved by Giorgio, and the extended versions were missing from 1977 until 2014 when I put them out.

Pic: I-Robots

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID     

My very own EP, ‘Laws Of Robotics’, which came out in 2020. Isaac Asimov’s original ‘Laws Of Robotics’ has always been a big influence on my music.

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

I would have loved to work with Freddie Mercury, Bob Marley and Larry Levan. Not because they’re legends, but only because I think they were incredible artists. I could have learned a great deal from them, but that’s sadly not possible anymore. 

For living artists, it would have to be Larry Heard, Cajmere, and Adrian Sherwood. Those will all happen, I promise… their styles are all essential parts of my background.

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

I love too many artists and labels to list, but here are some of my friends’ labels: Electronic Emergencies, Disko Milk, Sticky Music, and Agrellomatica.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

We Are Opilec Vol 5 is out now and we have some great stuff coming out. Look out for my track with Kathy Brown, ‘Respect’, which will also have a remix on it by Don Carlos. We’ve also got ‘Disco Ruin’, a compilation with contributions from Daniele Baldelli, Alexander Robotnick, Francesco Farfa, and Paolo Martini.  It’s the soundtrack to the forthcoming Disco Ruin Movie with Sky Arts, looking back at over 40 years of Italian nightlife, people, culture fashion and architecture.

Label Focus – Glacial Movements

Who says Glacial Movements have to work slowly? The prolific stable responsible for more than 50 key ambient releases tells us all…

Stalactite droplets, muffled footsteps, ice cap cracks. Releasing with a slew of key players (the likes of Loscil, Murcof and Machinefabriek) – the vision of Italian label Glacial Movements is coldly singular: to share ambient music with an icy, Antarctic feel. In freezing cold temperatures, we caught up with label boss Alessandro Tedeschi to discuss the label’s history, upcoming releases, and the thawing power of collaboration…

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

The name of the label is Glacial Movements and this particular choice already addresses the type of sonority that can be expected. In other words, ambient music that evokes and describes Arctic and Antarctic landscapes, and all that is closely connected with frost. The founder and artistic director is Alessandro Tedeschi, (pictured, below) also known as Netherworld, who has composed some albums produced on Glacial Movements.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

The label was born in 2006 and the first record release was the “Cryosphere” compilation in which some of Tedeschi’s favorite artists were invited such as Troum, Aidan Baker, Northaunt, Oophoi and others. Love and the strong attraction for silent and snow-covered landscapes, was certainly the main reason that triggered something. The idea was to recreate a connection between cold nature and humanity.

The label is like a hymn to an ecosystem that is slowly fading, unfortunately climate change is inexorably taking over, and every day we read news on the melting of ice, gigantic blocks of ice that are breaking off, or of glaciers that are losing their mass. If this continues, very soon we will no longer be able to see these beauties, resulting in rising sea levels and an increasingly unstable climate. The idea therefore is to create a strong community made up of artists who are asked to share all this, through the composition of a themed album.

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….

To date I have produced almost 50 albums, all in CD digipack and digital format. The list is quite long, so here is a selection: “Cryosphere was the starting point, then Rapoon Time Frost, Lull “Like A Slow River”, Netherworld “Morketid” ,” Algida Bellezza” and “Alchemy of ice”, Francisco Lopez “Amarok”, bvdub ” The art of dying alone “, Loscil ” coast / range / arc “, Retina.it” Descending into crevasse “, Celer” Without retrospect, the morning “, Pjusk” Tele “, Aidan Baker” Aneira “, bvdub” I Remember ” , Yair Elazar Glotman “Northern Gulfs”, Chihei Hatakeyma & Dirk Serries “The storm of silence” and ” Black Frost”, Machinefabriek “Stillness Soundtracks I and II”, Philippe Petit “You only live ice”, Scanner “The great crater “, Council Estate Electronics (Justin K Broadrick)” Arktika “, Eraldo Bernocchi & Netherworld ” Himuro “, bvudb ” Epilogues for the end of the sky” Loscil & bvdub ” Erebus “, Paul Schütze ” The Sky torn apart “, Murcof “Lost in time”, Northaunt ” Istid III “, Aria Rostami & Daniel Blomquist ” Wandering eye ” and ” Still “, Oophoi ” An aerial view”.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

The quality of the productions must always aim for the maximum. This is a fundamental aspect. Listening to Glacial Movements productions must make the listener feel a sense of isolation and detachment from reality. The sound must therefore always be engaging, never giving reference points. Each album undergoes a mastering process to make it even more immersive and deep.

Erik Lavender

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC) ?

Glacial Movements has a very well defined identity, in fact all the photos of the album covers come from the shots of professional photographers working in the Arctic Circle. The image can represent a landscape, animals or a detail of nature. The artist can choose which photographer and which photo best suits with the concept of his work, after which the whole digipack is designed and created. This process has been managed for several years by Rutger Zuydervelt aka Machinefabriek (who did almost all the designs) and Oleg Galay. I strongly believe that the best format is still the CD in digipack format, sometimes we design special finishes such as embossed parts, metallic colors, posters and booklets and much more.  

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE?  TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.

In reality there would be more than one, but surely the most important and incredible one was “Erebus” by bvdub and Loscil. After producing some records for them, I got the feeling that both of them could collaborate together, because I knew they could explore different aspects at the same time. The album has some really intense and wonderful moments, in “Erebus” there is grace, beauty and a sense of peace. Brock and Scott are two great artists of international fame and importance, and it is also for this reason that the album was so popular. 

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID

I have always been an admirer and passionate of everything that came out of the brilliant mind of Paul Schütze. He really made history, he’s a name of absolute respect. After a long period of inactivity, I had the honor of produced and released his “The sky torn apart” an album full of details and created with an impeccable technique that has always distinguished him. Despite this, I expected more interest from the public and also from the press.

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

I state that almost all the artists that I have always admired, I have had them on GM. However, I would very much like to collaborate with William Basinski, he is an artist who has a unique sensitivity and style. His compositions are melancholic poems and have that divine spark that I adore. Another artist I’d like to work with is Thomas Koner. He is the progenitor of glacial ambient music, and his visions are perfectly in line with what I want to explore. 

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

There are many that have accompanied me during all these years, and that have been part of my listening. Unfortunately some are no longer there, while others are still in business: Soleilmoon, Sentrax, Manifold, Sub Rosa, Ventricle, Beggars Banquet, Extreme, Barooni, Cold Meat Industry, Nextera. But what I believe was and still is the most credible and important label with a well-defined identity is undoubtedly is Touch. 

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

After Jokel by Erik Levander, then it’s John Sellekaers Observer Effect, Charles Richard Sonic Earth, a new album by Netherworld, Serga Kasinec Morana, Amphior Being Haunted, Galati Cold as a February Sky, Philippe Petit Ice Thawing, Massimo Pupillo (Zu) and others.

Label Focus – Tempo Records

Frodo runs us through the key points of his drum & bass label Tempo

WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?

Tempo Records, with sublabels: TempoSpeed, TempOzone, TempoSubs, TempoCore and TempoDubs.

Labelowner: -Frodo.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?

Back in 2013 with PRPLX – Fabric Of Space – TempoLP01

At the time I wasn’t hearing what I liked and the fun of releasing music on your own platform and that of many producers you liked is a great feeling.

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….

We’ve released music from artists like: PRPLX, DJ Trax, Voyager, Source Direct, DJ Krust, DJ Trace, Soul Intent, Gremlinz & Ink, Response, mSdoS, Switch, Chromatic.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?

Music that hits the dancefloor but also is suitable to listen to at home. Music that hopefully is still accurate in a few years time. Bringing diversity from an artist, usually three or four different flavoured tracks on a crystal clear vinyl 12” and digital. Quality mastering by Stuart Hawkes of Metropolis mastering, London. Always quality above quantity!

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC) ?

Always crystal clear vinyl with a quality designed label and standard designed outersleeve and proper innersleeve to protect the vinyl quality. Short videos with a 30 second clip of the release to be posted on https://Instagram.com/Temporec

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE?  TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.

Source Direct – TempoSpeed03, for obvious reasons, he’s one of a few quality producers (alongside Photek, Wax Doctor, Krust, 4 Hero and couple of others) who pioneered the jungle sound. I known Jim from a Tempo event a few years back where we chatted on a release for Tempo, a few years later it happened, that release made me proud as I’m – besides Photek – a huge Source Direct fan too.

Pic: Label boss Frodo, chilling

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID                                                                                                                               

I think I’m pretty happy about all the releases that where released so far. A great list of fine producers I worked with. Most releases sold out so that’s pretty good for a fairly small independent DIY label.

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?

That’s got to be Photek; The Truper, Studio Pressure, Special Forces, Origination. He’s my number one drum and bass producer! It’s the art of leaving out and still remain to bring the original funk in music and that’s a skill not many have. 

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?

Goldie’s Metalheadz for staying true to the craft, razor’s edge quality music! Doc Scott’s 31 Records and Klute’s Commercial Suicide, Ant-TC1’s Dispatch that are still going strong. I have great respect for labelowners that still release cool music from (new) artist they believe in after so many years, it’s a huge dedication and effort they make to keep a scene healthy and vibrant. Imagine if there weren’t any labels anymore…! I’m glad the scene at this moment is so vibrant with Jungle producers such as Tim Reaper, Sully, Mantra, Djinn, Sherelle and the whole Rupture & Repertoire crew to name just but a few. Big up to all the jungle crew.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?

After the release of Voyager’s ‘Shields Down’ 12″ I’ll be very pleased and thankful if the new sublabels do well in terms of making a few vinyl fans happy and still giving producers a platform to release their music.

There will be new albums coming from Response, Furney and Acid Lab. And some new limited picture discs on the TempoSpeed series from a few legendary top producers who haven’t released any new music in a while. Some hot breakbeat releases from new producers and a release by man of the moment’ Tim Reaper & Kloke on TempoCore in a few months too.

Tempo website

Label focus – Balkan Vinyl / I Love Acid

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Label Focus – Skint

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Label Focus – FatCat Records

Alex Knight talks us through the past, present and future of the legendary, genre-spanning FatCat empire

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WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOUR LABEL, AND WHO RUNS IT?
We are FatCat Records but have several imprints including the highly regarded “130701”, “Split” and “Splinter Series” as well as the electronic music imprints of “FCR” and “6dimensions”. The label is managed by co-founder Alex Knight, with a strong team of David Howell (130701, split and splinter), Samantha Orton, Lucille Vasseur and Sofia Jonsson.

WHEN & WHY DID THE LABEL START?
The label’s first release was in the autumn of 1996, WEB’s EVA EP” and felt like a very natural progression from the retail store and record shop. With the store closing in 1997 the label became the priority business and the focus for all FatCat activities.

GIVE US A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT YOU’VE RELEASED SINCE THEN….
The label is renowned for its diverse and eclectic output, from noise to punk, from electronica to no-wave, from classical to dance and everything in between. We have worked with some incredibly creative artists and have been lucky enough to be instrumental in the careers of Sigur Ros, Mum, Animal Collective, Vashti Bunyan, Frightened Rabbit, The Twilight Sad, Max Richter, Dustin O’halloran, Hauschka and many others. We’re lucky to have a fantastic current roster which includes the creative genius of Shida Shahabi, Resina, Ian William Craig, Holiday Ghosts, Jennifer Touch, TRAAMS and The Psychotic Monks, amongst others.

WHAT QUALITIES ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN THE MUSIC YOU RELEASE?
We like to blur the boundaries between genres and are looking for music which pushes the envelope or excels within its field. Music which impacts and makes you feel and think differently.

WHAT KIND OF VISUAL IDENTITY DOES THE LABEL HAVE (ARTWORK, VIDEOS ETC) ?
The label has always maintained a strong visual identity, the logo being instantly recognisable. We have also maintained a strong relationship with the designer Dave Thomas who has been responsible for the creation and execution of several striking covers and artworks. We do however encourage the artists we work with to forge their own links with creatives and strongly encourage collaboration.

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST SELLING RELEASE TO DATE? TELL US A BIT ABOUT IT AND WHY YOU THINK IT WAS SO POPULAR.
Sigur Ros must be the most popular artist we have released to date. We worked closely with them on their first two records, the internationally lauded Ageatis Byrjun and ‘( )’ LPs, both of which were critically acclaimed. The band have an ethereal quality, their music otherworldy and unlike anything else, they’re captivating and unusual and struck a chord with a massive audience. They also worked extremely hard, toured relentlessly and built themselves a formidable live reputation.

NAME ONE RELEASE THAT YOU THINK DESERVED TO GET MORE ATTENTION THAN IT DID
We released an LP from a Seattle based band called Welcome back in 2007. The album is called Sirs and is still a formidable body of work. They were an incredible live band too, bustling with ideas and energy. The record still sounds as fresh today as it did back then.

IF YOU COULD SIGN ANY ARTIST, ALIVE OR DEAD, WHO WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?
A bit of a cliché I know but I would have loved to have signed Radiohead, a band that are always evolving, always pushing the envelope but who have managed to maintain a broad fanbase across multiple albums.

WHICH OTHER LABELS DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY?
You must take your hat off to anyone that has the balls to run a label in this current climate, especially given the cards we have been dealt in this past year or so. There are literally so many excellent labels out there doing amazing things, Dark Entries, Super Viaduct, Hornin Sounds, Pressure Sounds, Zam Zam, LTM, FHXE and Paranoid London are all on my go to list as are many, many others!

WHAT CAN WE LOOK TO FROM YOUR LABEL NEXT?
We will celebrate our 25 year anniversary this year alongside the 20 year anniversary of the 130701 imprint. We are in the process of curating a number of bespoke anniversary editions of classic albums across the label as well as a number of new and exciting releases from new and existing signings.

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