Space Dimension Controller – The Pathway To Tiraquon6 review

There are albums that work as a whole and there are albums that impress in fits and bursts, the highlights carrying the filler moments. The latest, and most ambitious release to date, from Belfast’s Space Dimension Controller steadfastly belongs in the former camp. Posited as a prequel to the producer’s debut full length album due next year, The Pathway To Tiraquon6 would be classed as a standalone album by anyone else, though it’s debatable whether anyone in contemporary music retains the vision and eccentricity to come up with an eleven track set that is essentially the imaginary soundtrack to the inner workings of their mind.

Apologies to PR people everywhere, but the standard of press releases these days leaves a lot to be desired.  Hence, the fact The Pathway To Tiraquon6 arrived in tow with nearly 500 words detailing the concepts behind the music made this writer pay attention – as well as laugh vociferously. Of course, a concisely written press blurb detailing a 24th century alien invasion that precipitates the cosmic accident leading to our intrepid protagonist Mr 8040 being jettisoned through time to modern day earth is redundant if the music is not up to scratch.

Thankfully, this release is perhaps the finest example of Space Dimension Controller’s production prowess to date, veering effortlessly between moments of gentle calm and thrilling throbbing hi-tech futurism. Given the conceptual nature, close links are retained between the overarching story and the track titles. Furthermore, “Usurper” and “Flight Of The Escape Vessels” accurately portray the sensation of surprise alien attack and subsequent escape – as the dramatic, compressed metallic nature of the former is followed by the gliding, almost euphoric techno funk of the latter.

It’s down to personal preference whether you choose to invest fully in the concepts behind The Pathway To Tiraquon6. As mentioned above, the 47 minutes of music work as a whole and would be impressive enough without the additional eccentricities inherent with Space Dimension Controller. Personally, this odd nature just enhances his appeal: having producers who attend Fabric birthday marathons in a Dalek costume or parade around the Boiler Room wearing an R&S Records flag as a cape is more worthy of coverage than dissecting the exact nature of a kick drum.

Tony Poland