Various – Tigersushi: More GDM X

Since the turn of the century Parisian imprint Tigersushi has become renowned as a label with an unconditional love of music. Overseen by the daddy of electronic intrigue in Joakim, the label has forged an ethic of not being constricted by contemporary du jour sub genres, a policy that has seen them survive electroclash and its bastard offspring of the 2007/8 era, electro house.

This success was founded in part on the More GDM series of 12 inches and accompanying compilation, named in honour of 70s disco punk icon Gina X, which played host to a slew of electronic music icons, from Maurice Fulton to Metro Area to Cluster to John Tejada. Killer 12”s from the likes of Mu, Poni Hoax, Principles of Geometry and Krikor & The Hilbillies ensured the imprint remained a favourite amongst discothèque deejays. Tigersushi’s sub label Kill The DJ has also been responsible for canon defining mixes by Ivan Smagghe & Chloe and Glasgow’s imperious Optimo Espacio.

And now a decade on, Tigersushi presents More GDM X, a 2xCD compilation that celebrates the multiplicitous nature of the label’s roster which can be seen as a joyous glance towards the past that offers an exciting glimpse at future dance.

Split across the first CD is a cross section of classic Tigersushi hits and unreleased exclusives with several highlights. DyE’s ode to sweatshop loving Sportswear giants is a definite highlight, marrying the abrasive nature of a SebastiAn production with a sweet electronic melody, and is perfect for a more discerning dancefloor. Krikor & the Hilbillies “God Will Break It All” was a hit with DJs like Nadia Ksaiba and Rory Phillips last year and is infused with further punk funk energy here with the à la J-C Edit. In Flagranti fans will freak out to their Lost and Found edit of Freddie Mas, whereas meat eating Tigersushi fans might consider the benefits of vegetarianism after sitting through the six minutes of weirdness that is KIMs “Meat Is Murder”.

The second CD is compiled of Tigersushi’s more experimental output, with Joakim mixing together with no little degree of craft and subtlety tracks from Panico, Naxion, Principles of Geometry and his own music, in what can only be considered a cherry on the pie for fans of this label.

Review: Tony Poland