100% Secure Shopping

Studio equipment

Our full range of studio equipment from all the leading equipment and software brands. Guaranteed fast delivery and low prices.

Visit Juno Studio

100% Secure Shopping

DJ equipment

Our full range of DJ equipment from all the leading equipment and software brands. Guaranteed fast delivery and low prices.Visit Juno DJ

Same day dispatch
In stock guarantee
Strong safe packaging
Fast, safe international shipping
Established 20 years
100% Secure Shopping
Same day dispatch
Fast, safe international shipping
Low prices
5-star Trustpilot rating

Latest reviews

Kalita has already served up some seriously good reissues, but their latest may well be the most essential yet. It's the first licensed reissue of Vance and Suzzanne's sole single from 1980, "I Can't Get Along Without You" - a Larry Levan favourite that was only ever pressed in small quantities first time around. In it's A-side vocal form, the track is a deliciously warm and loved-up duet that mixes rich, mid-tempo New York disco grooves with some of the heady, glassy-eyed musicality of Philadelphia soul. It's genuinely magical - a super-sweet cut that sounds like end-of-night gold. Like the original 1980 private pressing on Vanton Records, the Kalita edition is backed by the similarly sweet, atmospheric Instrumental Mix, but this time we're also treated to a never-before-seen press photo, and extensive interview-based liner notes.
...Read more
When you use words like "prickly", "abrasive" and "uncompromising" it's rarely flattering. Consider Kim Gordon's exceptional powerhouse long form one of the exceptions. As far removed from music for the masses as you could hope for, it takes a particular talent to deliver work like "No Record Home". Labels such as punk certainly apply, but it's less about mouths gushing spittle amid the deafening screams of guitars and raucous vocals, and more about overall attitude. No change there for this co-founder of the mighty Sonic Youth then. Loud and intelligent, forthright and yet heartfelt and tender in its own unforgiving way, it's as far removed from wall of sound discordance as it is anything you could describe as remotely over-explored. Marrying the bloody-lipped electro of Peaches and body blow lows of EBM with gritty rock 'n' roll chords, those looking for originality that oozes repeatability should consider their hunt over, for now at least.
...Read more
The Mighty Mocambos - 2066
CD
$11.26
Having spent much of the last few years offering up tropical grooves under their alternative Bacao Rhythm & Steel Band alias, the Mighty Mocambos have finally got around to recording another funk-focused album. Of course, this is not straight-up revivalist funk or soul in the strict sense, but rather a collection of inventive cuts rooted in bustling breakbeats, fuzzy basslines, razor-sharp guitar riffs and hazy horns. Highlights come thick and fast throughout, from the sweet soul shuffle of Lee Fields collaboration "Where Do We Go From Here" and the rasping dancefloor soul-funk goodness of Gizelle Smith hook-up "Take On The World", to the 1950s sci-fi soundtrack cheeriness of "Return To Space" (featuring legendary composer Peter Thomas), and the synth-fired intergalactic dancefloor goodness of "Golden Shadow".
...Read more
Is this pop? Is this experimental? These are the thoughts that will have crossed many minds when encountering the kind of baffle Jai Paul offers. A guy who seems intent on creating curveball works of art, "BTSTU" in many ways is minimalist stuff, save for the concepts behind the sounds. Or at least its structures give the illusion of minimalism. From the first waterfall of synth to the way in which vocals are allowed to (quite literally) speak for themselves - a multitude of characters with one voice - it's at once bound for the charts and your bookshelf of classic works.
...Read more
Hip-hop's been a juxtaposition for quite some time. On the one hand, you have some of the most innovative work imaginable coming out of the farthest reaches. The other side is dominated by chancers and fakers. It's safe to say Clipping exist in the former. And we really do mean former. "There Existed An Addiction To Blood" is not just an album that is trying to extend the boundaries of a crew's sound, but the boundaries of the very genre itself. Horrorcore it may be, an establish sub-canon within the gamut, but this takes us to new, visceral extremes. Daveed Diggs' lyricism shines, cuts and satisfies, in particular on opener "Nothing Is Safe", which draws on influences such as John Carpenter's iconic theme to his equally iconic slasher flick, "Halloween". Bloodlust indeed, a theme that continues throughout a collection of work sitting just the right side of thrillingly scary, and just the right side of not.
...Read more
Tender, heartfelt, longing and packing sonic elements that can make even the most lovelorn and hopeless start swooning with the thought of what might be still to come for them. Canadian troubadour Patrick Watson's latest is nothing if not dripping in emotion, and that's not just a reference to his soft, thoughtful and thought-provoking voice. In many ways it seems impossible that such a gentile record can bowl the listener over with such force. But once you hit midway-point stunner "Melody Noir", with its subtle brass and "La La" chorus, it becomes clear that it's not only possible, but apparently rather easy for the songwriter in question. None of which is to say this is some wet Wednesday, mind. On his sixth long-form outing, Watson is nothing if not the experienced man who has seen it all.
...Read more
How in the name of all that's understandable can you follow up a Mercury Prize-nominated album that looked at the state of the world and answered all our concerns and questions about that in one fell swoop? How about by offering a heavier, louder second chapter, picking up where the last left off and yet emphasising different focal points? That seems to be the idea with "Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost - Part 2". It's Foals at their rockiest and most raucous, with the likes of (aptly-titled) "Black Bull" distorting the vocals and raising the grit on those guitars to 11. Things start off far more sparse, with "Red Desert"'s desolate synth keys invoking some dystopian wasteland. Perhaps the next destination for our civilisation. Whatever you think, from there we call at head-nodding, funk-driven rhythms, tear-inducing piano solos ("Ikaria" is pure beauty) and a finale of epic, soaring, hypnotic art-pop.
...Read more
It was in churches in the late sixties that Pablo Moses first started performing and a decade later he was putting out his own releases and making an immediate impact on the dub world. "Pave The Way" was his third full length album and was produced, recorded then mixed by the hands of the revered Geoffrey Chung of Jamaican Dynamic Sounds. Our picks of the bunch include album highlight "Africa Is For Me", the shuffling "A Step Before Hell" and superbly hazy "I See It Everyday".

Join us on: